Guus Docen

Guus Docen

Tuesday, 13 May 2014 18:46
Published in European Desk

Auto Union Museum Bergen opens again on Sunday

After the death of Henk Geerts , the owner of the Auto Union Museum in Bergen, the negotiations with Audi Germany took place but Henk’s wish to transfer the entire collection to the Audi museum, unfortunately, couldn’t be fulfilled. The last few months, there were many requests from car-enthusiasts to visit the museum. On Sunday the 29st of March, the doors opened again for those interested to see the complete collection. The museum attendants were enthusiastic and it was suggested to repeat this again the next few months. Provisional Sundays to visit the museum are: 18 and 25 May, 1 and 15 June , 6 and 20 July. Opening time from 12:00 h. to 16:00 h. In the spirit of the museum , where classic cars and changing art were always in harmony with each other , there are contacts with professional artists to exhibit their work. At the moment Henk’s inheritors are preparing themselves to find good destinations for all the cars, motorbikes, mopeds, parts, tools and DKW posters. The expectation is that there is still some time left to visit in the museum.
Sunday, 20 April 2014 04:18
Published in Marques

Austin 7 Racing Cars

The original Chummy Tourer first appeared in 1922. It had 190 cm wheelbase, a 10 bhp engine and the weight of 356 kg. Its tiny side valve engine with two bearing crankshaft only 28.6 millimetres in diameter proved tough enough to win the longest and races such as Monza, Brooklands, Ulster and elsewhere, and to withstand supercharging.The Ulster Super Sports car was Austin's most serious effort in the sports car market. It had an A frame, transverse leaf spring at the front, 1/4 eliptic springs at the rear, and tiny four wheel brakes. The 747 cc side valve engine was fitted with a gear-driven Cozette supercharger, special cylinder head, valve gear and camshaft and pump-cooling. The two-bearing crank shaft was required to turn over at 5000 rpm. It was pressure-lubricated and balanced.The three speed gear box had close ratio gears. Wings, hood, windscreen and lights were quickly removable for competition work and the weights with a doorless, open, two-seater body and spidery outside exhaust system was around 435 kg. With 33 brake horsepower available, the little car could exceed 120 kilometres an hour (75 MPH) reliably. An unblown 24 bhp version could reach 100 kilometres an hour (60 mph).The blown car, raced by the factory in 1929 scored four class wins in major British races, and finished third and fourth in the Ulster Touring Trophy. In 1930 the little orange cars took three more British class wins and won the 500 miles race at Brooklands outright at 134.25 kilometres (83.42 mph).The overhead cam MG Miidget introduced intruded on Austin successes in the 750 CC racing cars but more plebeian sporting Sevens provided enthusiasts with a wide variety of fun racing at minimal cost for many years.
Tuesday, 15 April 2014 06:26
Published in Melbourne Desk

Eddington 2014 - Barry Quantrell

Barry Quantrell is in the process of building and developing a new race car. The project is nearing completion, and in the meantime he has accepted Motormarques' invitation to submit photographs taken at Eddington during March 2014.
Monday, 14 April 2014 22:58
Published in Melbourne Desk

Myrniong Hillclimb Sprint 2014

A big turnout saw return of favourites and brilliant newcomers.  A special treat was to see Jim Russell back in form, driving Testa Plata (Ford V8 Spl - Car No 1)Special note on Austin 7 racing cars. The original Chummy Tourer first appeared in 1922. It had 190 cm wheelbase, a 10 bhp engine and the weight of 356 kg. Its tiny side valve engine with two bearing crankshaft only 28.6 millimetres in diameter proved tough enough to win the longest and races such as Monza, Brooklands, Ulster and elsewhere, and to withstand supercharging.The Ulster Super Sports car was Austin's most serious effort in the sports car market. It had an A frame, transverse leaf spring at the front, 1/4 eliptic springs at the rear, and tiny four wheel brakes. The 747 cc side valve engine was fitted with a gear-driven Cozette supercharger, special cylinder head, valve gear and camshaft and pump-cooling. The two-bearing crank shaft was required to turn over at 5000 rpm. It was pressure-lubricated and balanced.The three speed gear box had close ratio gears. Wings, hood, windscreen and lights were quickly removable for competition work and the weights with a doorless, open, two-seater body and spidery outside exhaust system was around 435 kg. With 33 brake horsepower available, the little car could exceed 120 kilometres an hour (75 MPH) reliably. An unblown 24 bhp version could reach 100 kilometres an hour (60 mph).The blown car, raced by the factory in 1929 scored four class wins in major British races, and finished third and fourth in the Ulster Touring Trophy. In 1930 the little orange cars took three more British class wins and won the 500 miles race at Brooklands outright at 134.25 kilometres (83.42 mph).